CWRTDC'S NEXT MEETING:

PERRY D. JAMIESON
speaks on
"GENERAL WINFIELD SCOTT HANCOCK"

Tuesday, May 9, 2017
at Ft. McNair Officers' Club, Washington, DC
(see directions here) or (download them in pdf here)

6 pm: Social Hour (cash bar)
7 pm: Dinner ($36 for dinner and lecture)
Pork Tenderloin, Salad and Key Line Pie
8 pm: Lecture ($5 for lecture only)

 Reservations required by 5:00 pm, Wednesday, May 3rd 

SEE THE INSTRUCTIONS TO THE RIGHT OF THIS POST
TO MAKE RESERVATIONS AND REMIT PAYMENT
If you have any problems making reservations online or would like to know about alternatives to making reservations or payments online, please email reservations@cwrtdc.org  <reservations@cwrtdc.org>

About the Topic:  General Winfield Scott Hancock gained his greatest fame for his crucial contributions to the Federal victory at Gettysburg in July of 1863. Union veterans remembered Hancock as a general who led from the front and whose forceful presence could change the course of a battle. In addition to his service in the Civil War, though, the General's military service included experiences during the Mexican-American War, Reconstruction, and the Indian wars. He also pursued a national political career, which ended in an unsuccessful try for the presidency in 1880.



Dr. Jamieson’s talk will introduce the General as an American soldier who put his mark on many of the important military and political events of his lifetime.  It will highlight topics covered n his 2003 book, Winfield Scott Hancock: Gettysburg Hero.


Dr. ”Jamieson handles well the details of Hancock's wartime rise to fame as ‘Hancock the Superb,’ as he does the rest of the general's Civil War service," wrote John E. Deppen on the Civil War News Web site. David Fitzpatrick, writing in the Journal of Military History, noted that the book is for the general public and "will be of value to those who have a casual interest in the Civil War." 


About the Author:   Dr. Perry D. Jamieson, was born in Detroit, Michigan, and spent his boyhood in one of its suburbs, Farmington. He grew up reading Bruce Catton (one of our Round Table’s founder’s), T. Harry Williams, and other historians of the Civil War centennial era. Dr. Jamieson’s parents encouraged his interest in history and they gave him his first look at the Antietam battlefield, on a summer vacation trip. That memorable visit made the battle seem more real to him. The terrain of Sharpsburg’s farms and the words on the War Department tablets reinforced the historical accounts that he had read. The experience confirmed in his young mind that there really had been a Battle of Antietam: it wasn’t a story made up by Bruce Catton and other writers.

Throughout his career, Dr. Jamieson has always has enjoyed meeting people with an interest in the American past and in historic preservation. The Antietam battlefield has been the scene of a number of milestones in his life. For example, he met Stephanie Deats at Michigan State, they married, and spent part of their honeymoon at Antietam. “Ever since then,” Dr. Jamieson reports, “I’ve had people—especially women--tell me that it was an odd thing for me to drag a new wife to a Civil War battlefield. I’ve never understood that.  Antietam is a much better place to visit than Niagara Falls.” 


Dr. Jamieson received his Ph.D in history from Wayne State University, taught at the University of Texas, and served as the historian at the Air Force History Support Office, in Washington, DC.  He has also lectured at the U.S. Defense Department's Joint Military Intelligence College, and he was appointed fellow to the Grady McWhiney Research Foundation.


In fact, Dr. Jamieson studied under Grady McWhiney, a noted Civil War historian, and he  wrote his first book with McWhiney, entitled Attack and Die: Civil War Military Tactics and the Southern Heritage. The book is considered a significant work on Civil War military tactics.


Dr. Jamieson's other books include Crossing the Deadly Ground: United States Army Tactics, 1865-1899, University of Alabama Press (Tuscaloosa, AL), 1994; Death in September: The Antietam Campaign, Ryan Place Publishers (Forth Worth, TX), 1995; and of course, Winfield Scott Hancock: Gettysburg Hero, McWhiney Foundation Press (Abilene, TX), 2003.


In addition to his books on the Civil War, Dr. Jamieson has written about U.S. Air Force history.  For example, in Lucrative Targets: The U.S. Air Force in the Kuwaiti Theater of Operations, he provides a look at the U.S. Air Force's involvement in the U.S. war with Iraq in the early 1990s, particularly focusing on the force's contribution to two operations: Desert Shield and Desert Storm.



After ending his Air Force career, Dr. Jamieson and Stephanie moved to Sharpsburg, where he now spends time hiking his favorite place, the Antietam battlefield. He has always been impressed with the sharp contrast between the area‘s past and present.  On September 17, 1862 the Antietam valley was the terrifying scene of horrific events. Today it’s a reassuring landscape of peaceful fields. “I’ve seen a lot of battlefields,” Dr. Jamieson says, “ones in the United States and elsewhere--Marston Moor, Culloden, Waterloo, and many others. None of them takes hold of me the way that Antietam does.” He is concerned that, as historian Grady McWhiney once put it, “Americans are in danger of losing their history.” He has warned, “If we don’t preserve the Antietam battlefield, a crucial part of our national past will disappear forever. We can’t let that happen. . ..”




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For information about the Round Table and to apply for membership, see the Tab above marked "About Us/ Membership Information" or click HERE 

CWRTDC'S PREVIOUS MEETING:
BILL BACKUS
speaks on
"THE BRISTOE STATION CAMPAIGN"

Tuesday, April 11, 2017
at Ft. McNair Officers' Club, Washington, DC
(see directions here) or (download them in pdf here)

6 pm: Social Hour (cash bar)
7 pm: Dinner ($36 for dinner and lecture)
8 pm: Lecture ($5 for lecture only)

 Reservations required by 5:00 pm, Wednesday, April 5th 

SEE THE INSTRUCTIONS TO THE RIGHT OF THIS POST
TO MAKE RESERVATIONS AND REMIT PAYMENT
If you have any problems making reservations online or would like to know about alternatives to making reservations or payments online, please email reservations@cwrtdc.org  <reservations@cwrtdc.org>
About the Topic: Certain battles enjoy wide recognition. References to Gettysburg, Antietam, and Manassas abound in American history textbooks and popular and scholarly Civil War titles. But what about smaller, lesser known battles? Join historian Bill Backus, author of A Want of Vigilance: The Bristoe Station Campaign, October 9-19, 1863, to learn about Robert E. Lee’s last offensive campaign of the Civil War.


Indeed, the months after Gettysburg had hardly been quiet; they were filled with skirmishes, cavalry clashes, and a lot of marching. Nonetheless, Union commander Maj. Gen. George Gordon Meade had yet to come to serious blows with his Confederate counterpart, Gen. Robert E. Lee.

"Lee is undoubtedly bullying you," one of Meade’s superiors goaded.

Lee’s army—severely bloodied at Gettysburg—did not have quite the offensive capability it once possessed, yet Lee’s aggressive nature could not be quelled. He looked for the chance to strike out at Meade.

In mid-October, 1863, both men shifted their armies into motion. Each surprised the other. Quickly, Meade found himself racing northward for safety along the Orange & Alexandria Railroad, with Lee charging up the rail line behind him.

Last stop: Bristoe Station.


Authors Robert Orrison and Bill Backus have worked at the Bristoe Station battlefield, which is now surrounded by one of the fastest-growing parts of Virginia. In A Want of Vigilance, they trace the campaign from the armies’ camps around Orange and Culpeper northwest through the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains and along the vital railroad—to Centreville and back—in a back-and-forth game of cat and mouse: the "goggle-eyed snapping turtle" versus "the old gray fox" pitted against each other in one of the most overlooked periods of the war."

A Want of Vigilance also includes: a foreword by J. Michael Miller; and appendices about, among other topics, the 1st Maine Cavalry by John R. Tole; the Battle of Rappahannock Station and Kelly’s Ford by Michael Block; the First Battle at Bristoe Station by Jay Greevy; and the Fall of ’63 by Chris Mackowski.

About the Speaker:  A native of Connecticut, Bill Backus graduated from the University of Mary Washington with a bachelor’s degree in Historic Preservation. Mr. Backus is currently working for multiple Civil War sites in Northern Virginia, including the Prince William Historic Preservation Division (alongside his wife Paige). He is the Historic Site Manager at Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park, as well as the Brentsville Courthouse Historic Centre. Mr. Backus has also worked for the National Park Service at Vicksburg National Military Park and Petersburg National Battlefield. Bill an Paige (and their dog, Barley) reside in historic Brentsville, Virginia.
 

Sources:
Amazon.com   
Emerging Civil War
Bull Run CWRT

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For information about the Round Table and to apply for membership, see the Tab above marked "About Us/ Membership Information" or click HERE 
CWRTDC'S PREVIOUS MEETING:

Historian Tom Perry at the site he saved, J. E. B. Stuart’s Birthplace, the Laurel Hill Farm,

just outside Mount Airy in Ararat, Patrick County, VA


THOMAS D. PERRY
speaks on
"J. E. B. STUART AND HIS BROTHERS"

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

at Ft. McNair Officers' Club, Washington, DC

(see directions here) or (download them in pdf here)

6 pm: Social Hour (cash bar)
7 pm: Dinner ($36 for dinner and lecture)
8 pm: Lecture ($5 for lecture only)

Reservations required by 5:00 pm, Wednesday, March 8th

SEE THE INSTRUCTIONS TO THE RIGHT OF THIS POST
TO MAKE RESERVATIONS AND REMIT PAYMENT
If you have any problems making reservations online or would like to know about alternatives to making reservations or payments online, please email reservations@cwrtdc.org <reservations@cwrtdc.org>

About the Topic:  Mr. Perry will be speaking about J. E. B. Stuart and his brothers,  William Alexander Stuart, who ran the saltworks in Saltville, Virginia during the war, and John Dabney Stuart, who was a surgeon in the 54th VA Infantry. He will also discuss men who fought in the war such as Johnathan Hanby Carter, David French Boyd and others who are relatively obscure, but were close to Stuart before and during the war.


About the Speaker:  A Patrick County High School and Virginia Tech graduate, Historian Thomas D. Perry studied under renowned Civil War Historian, James I. “Bud” Robertson, Jr., and now speaks throughout the region and country about J. E. B. Stuart and the regional history in Virginia surrounding his home county of Patrick.  Mr. Perry is the author and publisher of over forty books, including  Ascent to Glory, The Genealogy of J. E. B. Stuart; The Dear Old Hills of Patrick: J. E. B. Stuart and Patrick County; J. E. B. Stuart’s Birthplace: A Guide For Educators and Visitor; J. E. B. Stuart’s Birthplace: The History Of The Laurel Hill Farm; Images of Patrick County Virginia; Images of Henry County, Virginia; and Notes From The Free State Of Patrick.



Mr. Perry also wrote the eight interpretive signs about Laurel Hill’s history along with the Virginia Civil War Trails sign and the new Virginia Historical Highway Marker in 2002. He spent many years researching and traveling all over the nation to find Stuart materials. He continues his work to preserve Stuart’s Birthplace, producing the Laurel Hill Teacher’s Guide for educators and the Laurel Hill Reference Guide for groups.


Mr. Perry founded the J. E. B. Stuart Birthplace in 1990. The non-profit organization has preserved 75 acres of the Stuart property including the house site where J. E. B. Stuart was born on February 6, 1833.  Mr. Perry also used his book Images of America Henry County Virginia to raise over $25,000 for the Bassett Historical Center, “The Best Little Library in Virginia,” and as editor of the Henry County Heritage Book raised another $30,000. Perry was responsible for over $200,000 of the $800,000 raised to expand the regional history library. 


In 2004, Mr. Perry began The Free State Of Patrick Internet History Group, which has become the largest historical organization in the area, with over 500 members. He also produces a monthly email newsletter about regional history entitled  Notes From The Free State of Patrick that comes from his website www.freestateofpatrick.com.  Mr. Perry alsocan be seen on Virginia Public Television’s Forgotten Battlefields: The Civil War in Southwest Virginia, with his mentor Bud  Robertson.

Mr. Perry’s collection of papers relating to Stuart and Patrick County history is in the Special Collections Department of the Carol M. Newman Library at Virginia Tech under the auspices of the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies.

Mr. Perry is the recipient of the John E. Divine Award from the Civil War Education Association, the Hester Jackson Award from the Surry County Civil War Round Table, and the Best Article Award from the Society of North Carolina Historians for his article on Stoneman’s Raid in 2008. In 2010, he received acknowledgement from the Bassett Public Library Association for his work to expand the Bassett Historical Center and was named Henry County Virginia Man of the Year by www.myhenrycounty.com. Mr. Perry also recently received the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Community Service Award from the Patrick Henry Daughters of the American Revolution.
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For information about the Round Table and to apply for membership, see the Tab above marked "About Us/ Membership Information" or click HERE 





The Civil War Round Table of the District of Columbia 
 and  
The Lincoln Group of the District of Columbia  
 jointly and proudly sponsor

NOAH ANDRE TRUDEAU



who will speak on

"LINCOLN AT CITY POINT"

 Wednesday, February 15, 2017

at Ft. McNair Officers' Club, Washington, DC


6 pm: Social Hour (cash bar)
7 pm: Dinner ($36 for dinner and lecture)
8 pm: Lecture ($5 for lecture only)
(please arrive at 7:30pm for the lecture)


Members and guests of either the CWRTDC or the

Lincoln Group should make reservations on this website.
RESERVATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY 5PM ET, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, TO MEET CLUB DEADLINES 

Space may be limited, so make your reservations early.

SEE THE INSTRUCTIONS AT THE RIGHT OF THIS PAGE OR AT
 http://cwrtdc-meetings.blogspot.com/
TO MAKE RESERVATIONS AND REMIT PAYMENT

If you have any questions about making reservations online, please email reservations@cwrtdc.org 

ABOUT THE TOPIC:
In March of 1865, the United States was at a crossroads and, truth be told, Abraham Lincoln was a sick man. “I am very unwell,” he confided to a close acquaintance. A vast and terrible civil war was winding down, leaving momentous questions for a war-weary President to address. A timely invitation from General Grant provided the impetus for an escape to City Point, Virginia, a journey from which Lincoln drew much more than he ever expected. Noah Andre Trudeau book, Lincoln’s Greatest Journey: Sixteen Days that Changed a Presidency, March 24 – April 8, 1865, offers the first comprehensive account of a momentous time. 

Lincoln’s trip to City Point allowed him to escape the constant interruptions in the nation’s capital that were carrying off a portion of his “vitality” and to make personal amends for having presided over the most destructive war in American history in order to save the nation.  He returned to Washington sixteen days later with a renewed sense of purpose, urgency, and direction that would fundamentally shape his second term agenda. 

Mr. Trudeau will describe what really happened to Lincoln during and after this trip—Lincoln’s longest break from the White House since he had taken office—to reveal an unconventional and important new picture of Lincoln. This is Lincoln at a time of great personal and national change, when he made peace with the past and became firmly future-focused during those last weeks of his life. Rather than the well-worn narrative treating Lincoln as a dead man walking when he returns to Washington, Trudeau paints him as he surely was: a changed man profoundly influenced by all that he experienced while at City Point. 


ABOUT THE SPEAKER:

The son of two World War II veterans, Noah Andre Trudeau is the author of numerous military history articles covering not only the Civil War, but also the Revolutionary War, the Mexican-American War, World Wars I and II, and the Spanish Civil War. 

He is also the author of eight books on the Civil War, including The Last Citadel: Petersburg, Virginia, June 1864-April 1865; Like Men of War: Black Troops in the Civil War 1862-1865 (honored with the Grady McWhiney Research Foundation's Jerry Coffey Memorial Book Prize); Gettysburg: A Testing of Courage, a fresh history of the iconic battle; and Southern Storm: Sherman's March to the Sea, a history of Sherman’s march through Georgia, Mr. Tudeau  has also authored a short biography of the South’s leading general, Robert E. Lee: Lessons in Leadership, completed as part of a “Great Generals Series” edited by General Wesley K. Clark.  Lincoln’s Greatest Journey is Mr. Trudeau's latest book.

In addition to his books on the Civil War, Mr. Trudeau has written a number of articles for military history magazines, such as Civil War Times Illustrated, Gettysburg Magazine, Blue and Gray, North & South, The Columbiad, America's Civil War and Military History Quarterly.

Mr. Trudeau studied history at the State University of New York at Albany and was formerly an executive producer at National Public Radio.  He currently lives with his wife in Washington, D.C.

 
Adapted from the following sources:
Macmillan publishers
www.c-span.org
www.amazon.com


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For information about the Civil War Round Table of the District of Columbia and to apply for membership, see the Tab above marked "About Us/ Membership Information" or click HERE 


For information about the Lincoln Group of the District of Columbia click HERE
CWRTDC'S PREVIOUS MEETING:


 
SCOTT C. PATCHAN

speaks on

"THE LAST BATTLE OF WINCHESTER: SHERIDAN AND EARLY IN THE VALLEY CAMPAIGN"


 Tuesday, January 10, 2017
at Ft. McNair Officers' Club, Washington, DC

ABOUT THE TOPIC:
Mr. Patchan’s presentation will focus on Gen. Grant's unexpected decision to place fellow Ohioan Phil Sheridan in command in the Shenandoah. Sheridan was not an inevitable choice, but Grant wanted to have someone he could rely upon.  Mr. Patchan will examine Sheridan's background and review the events as they unfolded in 1864 culminating in Sheridan's victory at the third and last Battle of Winchester. 

A posting on www.goodreads.com describes Mr. Patchan’s book on this topic as the first serious study to chronicle this battle, which was the largest, longest, and bloodiest battle fought in the Shenandoah Valley. What began about daylight did not end until dusk, when the victorious Union army routed the Confederates. It was the first time Stonewall Jackson's former Corps had ever been driven from a battlefield, and its defeat set the stage for the final climax of the 1864 Valley Campaign.

This Northern victory was a long time coming, however. During the spring and summer of 1864, General Early had aggressively led the veterans of Jackson's Army of the Valley District to one victory after another at Lynchburg, Monocacy, Snickers Gap, and Kernstown.  In response, Grant cobbled together a formidable force under Phil Sheridan, an equally redoubtable commander. Sheridan's task was a tall one: sweep Jubal Early's Confederate army out of the bountiful Shenandoah and reduce the verdant region of its supplies.

Five weeks of complex maneuvering and sporadic combat followed before the opposing armies ended up at Winchester, an important town in the northern end of the Valley that had changed hands dozens of times over the previous three years. Tactical brilliance and ineptitude were on display throughout the day-long affair as Sheridan threw infantry and cavalry against the thinning Confederate ranks and as Early and his generals shifted to meet each assault. A final blow against Early's left flank finally collapsed the Southern army, killing one of the Confederacy's finest combat generals, and planted the seeds of the victory at Cedar Creek the following month.

Scott Patchan's vivid prose, which is based upon more than two decades of meticulous research and an unparalleled understanding of the battlefield, is complemented with numerous original maps and explanatory footnotes that enhance the reader’s understanding of this watershed battle. Rich in analysis and character development, The Last Battle of Winchester is certain to become a classic Civil War battle study.  Source (click to link): GoodReads

Mr. Patchan’s book, Shenandoah Summer, studies Gen. Early’s disastrous battles in the Shenandoah Valley which ultimately resulted in his ignominious dismissal. But Early’s lesser-known summer campaign of 1864, between his raid on Washington and Phil Sheridan’s renowned fall campaign, had a significant impact on the political and military landscape of the time. By focusing on military tactics and battle history in uncovering the facts and events of these little-understood battles, Mr. Patchan’s book offers a new perspective on Early’s contributions to the Confederate war effort—and to Union battle plans and politicking.

Specifically, Mr. Patchan details the previously unexplored battles at Rutherford’s Farm and Kernstown (a pinnacle of Confederate operations in the Shenandoah Valley) and examines the campaign’s influence on President Lincoln’s reelection efforts. He also provides insights into the personalities, careers, and roles in the campaign of Confederate general John C. Breckinridge, Union general George Crook, and Union colonel James A. Mulligan, with his “fighting Irish” brigade from Chicago. Finally, Mr. Patchan reconsiders the ever-colorful and controversial General Early himself, whose importance in the Confederate military pantheon this book at last makes clear. Source (click to link): Amazon

Other resources (click to link):
Civil War Trust
National Park Service
 

ABOUT THE SPEAKER:
A life-long student of military history, who graduated from James Madison University in the Shenandoah Valley, Scott C. Patchan is widely regarded as the leading authority and tour guide of the 1864 Valley Campaign.

He is the author of many articles and books, including The Forgotten Fury: The Battle of Piedmont (1996), Shenandoah Summer: The 1864 Valley Campaign (2007), Second Manassas: Longstreet’s Attack and the Struggle for Chinn Ridge (2011), and most recently, The Last Battle of Winchester: Phil Sheridan, Jubal Early, and the Shenandoah Valley Campaign, August 7 - September 19, 1864. Mr. Patchan also serves as a Director on the board of the Kernstown Battlefield Association in Winchester, Virginia, and is a member of the Shenandoah Valley Battlefield Foundation’s Resource Protection Committee.

Mr. Patchan is a Director of Administration (Accounting, IT,
and HR) for Fairfax County. He is responsible for managing financial, budgetary, personnel and IT functions.  Mr. Patchan has specialized in redesigning internal controls and strengthening budgetary and purchasing processes and has been involved in strategic planning and development of the County’s fiscal direction.  Source(click to link): LinkedIn 
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For information about the Round Table and to apply for membership, see the Tab above marked "About Us/ Membership Information" or click HERE