who will speak about
   "General Benjamin Butler"

Tuesday, April 9, 2019
at Patton Hall Officers' Club,
214 Jackson Avenue, Ft. Myer, VA  22211
(take the elevator to the right as you enter the building or
take the stairs to the left up one level to the first floor)

6 pm: Social Hour (cash bar)
6:45 pm: Dinner ($36 for dinner and lecture)
8 pm: Lecture ($5 for lecture only)
 
Reservations Due By April 1, 5pm ET
(cancellations after the due date are non-refundable, as we must pay for the dinners regardless of the actual attendance)
SEE THE INSTRUCTIONS TO THE RIGHT OF THIS POST TO MAKE AND PAY FOR RESERVATIONS OR VISIT  http://cwrtdc-meetings.blogspot.com/ 
If you have any problems making reservations online or would like to know about alternatives to making reservations or payments online, please email reservations@cwrtdc.org.
Non-CWRTDC members must make reservations and remit payment online

Non DoD attendees will need to enter through security at the Hatfield gate; see instructions to enter Ft. Myer HERE
(also see directions here) or (download them in pdf here)Interactive Public Transportation Options are HERE



About the Topic: 
Brian Matthew Jordan will discuss Union General Benjamin Butler, who became known in the South as the “Beast” for his actions as military governor after the fall of New Orleans.  He will examine criticisms of Butler’s battlefield tactics as well as some of his questionable financial dealings during and after the war. 



About the Speaker: 
Dr. Jordan is assistant professor of history at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses covering the Civil War and Reconstruction, American military history, and the U.S. history survey.  A cultural historian of the nation’s fratricidal conflict, he is interested in the impact Civil War battles have on individual soldiers and the study of veteran memory.

Dr. Jordan is the author of Marching Home: Union Veterans and Their Unending Civil War, a narrative history of the men who won the war but could not adjust to the peace. The book received the 2016 Governor John Andrew Award of the Union Club of Boston and was a finalist for the 2016 Pulitzer Prize in History.


Dr. Jordan earned his B.A. in History/Civil War Studies from Gettysburg College in 2009; a M.Phil. and a M.A. in History from Yale University in 2012; and a Ph.D. in History from Yale in 2013, where his dissertation (supervised by David W. Blight) earned the 2014 George Washington Egleston Prize (for Best U.S. History Dissertation) and the 2014 John Addison Porter Prize, a university-wide award. 

 
Dr. Jordan is currently editing a collection of essays about Union and Confederate veterans and a biography of the controversial Union general and Reconstruction leader, Benjamin Butler. 


A native of Akron, Ohio, who admits now to being a proud Texan, Dr. Jordan serves as the book review editor for The Civil War Monitor and is a member of the Society of Civil War Historians. 


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For information about the Round Table and to apply for membership, see the Tab above marked "About Us/ Membership Information" or click HERE
who will speak about
"The Petersburg Campaign"

Tuesday, March 12, 2019
at Patton Hall Officers' Club,
214 Jackson Avenue, Ft. Myer, VA  22211
(take the elevator to the right as you enter the building or
take the stairs to the left up one level to the first floor)

6 pm: Social Hour (cash bar)
6:45 pm: Dinner ($36 for dinner and lecture)
8 pm: Lecture ($5 for lecture only)
 
Reservations Due By March 4, 5pm ET
(cancellations after the due date are non-refundable, as we must pay for the dinners regardless of the actual attendance)
SEE THE INSTRUCTIONS TO THE RIGHT OF THIS POST TO MAKE AND PAY FOR RESERVATIONS OR VISIT  http://cwrtdc-meetings.blogspot.com/ 
If you have any problems making reservations online or would like to know about alternatives to making reservations or payments online, please email reservations@cwrtdc.org.
Non-CWRTDC members must make reservations and remit payment online

Non DoD attendees will need to enter through security at the Hatfield gate; see instructions to enter Ft. Myer HERE
(also see directions here) or (download them in pdf here)Interactive Public Transportation Options are HERE



About the Topic: 
Mr. Greene's topic will be the second of Ulysses S. Grant's eight offenses against Petersburg.
 
The Second Offense, beginning on June 20, 1864, was part of Grant's master plan for enveloping the Confederate right and cutting the Petersburg and Southside Railroads.  The maneuver involved primarily the Union's Second and Sixth Corps with most of the fighting taking place along the Jerusalem Plank Road.
 
The fighting ended on June 23 without achieving Grant's objectives.  Both Union corps were badly mauled and 2,200 Union soldiers were captured, most of them destined for Andersonville prison.
  
Another facet of the Second Offensive involved Union cavalry under generals James Wilson and August Kautz.  Grant's directive to the generals was to conduct an extensive raid against Lee's railroad communications south of the James River.  At dawn on June 22, about 5,500 troopers swung into their saddles and began what would be a three hundred mile, ten day campaign of hard riding and fighting in no less than four separate cavalry battles. 

The raid succeeded in destroying many miles of track, but only temporarily.  Wilson and Kautz lost about 900 troopers. most of whom were captured during the raid's final engagement at Ream's Station on June 29.



About the Speaker: 
A. Wilson Greene is one of the nation's preeminent public historians and is widely recognized as the expert historian on the longest campaign of the Civil War: the 292-day siege of Petersburg, Virginia, which lasted from the summer of 1864 through the spring of 1865.
 
Mr. Greene served for 22 years as the executive director of Pamplin Historical Park and the Museum of the Civil War Soldier in Petersburg.  Pamplin Historical Park is a 424-acre, privately funded, historical park which contains the site of the Union breakthrough of Confederate defensive lines protecting Richmond and Petersburg on April 2, 1865.  One week later, Robert E. Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia to Ulysses S. Grant and the Army of the Potomac at Appomattox Courthouse, effectively ending the Civil War in the eastern theater.

Mr. Greene attended Florida State University and graduated in 1972 with a BA degree in American history. He went on to graduate school at Louisiana State University where he studied under the well-known American historian, T. Harry Williams.  After college, Greene went to work for the National Park Service as a historian and park ranger.  He left the National Park Service in 1990 to become the first director of the newly formed Association for the Preservation of Civil War Sites, now called the American Battlefield Trust.
 
Because he was a well-known Civil War historian, Mr. Greene was selected as a script reviewer for the 1993 feature film "Gettysburg" and later as historical adviser for the sequel film, "Gods and Generals."  In 1995, he became the first executive director of  Pamplin Historical Park. 


Mr. Greene retired in 2017 to devote his time to research, writing, and leading Civil War battlefield tours.  He has published numerous books and articles on Civil War topics.  Mr. Greene recently completed A Campaign of Giants: The Battle for Petersburg From the Crossing of the James to the Crater.  It is the first of a projected three volume study of the Petersburg Campaign.


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For information about the Round Table and to apply for membership, see the Tab above marked "About Us/ Membership Information" or click HERE